Some Advices for Freelance Designers

As a newcomer in freelance world, I need some tips about this business, how to get clients, and top of all how to make money – with or without clients from the successful ones. This site is what I need, and also for everyone who thought about freelancing.

Here I quote some advices from some successful designers:

“Know your value. Too often people start off under pricing everything because they feel they have to do so because they don’t have the experience or it is the only way to get clients. If you aren’t uncomfortable with the price you are asking for then you are underbidding yourself. Don’t be afraid to lose some business because someone wasn’t willing to pay what you want.  Being a design means having some sort of freedom, but it is up to you to make it happen.”

(Paul Scrivens, a professional Product Designer at Media Temple and helps facilitate intelligent conversation with Drawar, a forum exclusively for designers who want to discuss fundamentals of design and the industry.)

———-

“The biggest piece of advice that I would give an upcoming designer comes in a package based from the little things that I have learned over my short career as a designer. These would be perfect for someone just starting out: Don’t undervalue your work. Seek criticism, not praise. Always keep learning & don’t be a static learner: do this by reading books, magazines, blogs and by practicing. Collect & share things. Teach others. Never give up. Keep practicing. Again, keep practicing.”

(Jacob Cass, a strategic, multidisciplinary designer, and art director who lives, and works in NYC, while also running three popular blogs; Just Creative DesignLogo of the Day and Logo Designer Blog.)

———-

“There are a million things I wish I knew before setting out working for clients and managing my business. I’ve whittled them down to a couple that I think are really important, and will steer you in the right direction.

  1. Don’t be afraid of raising your hourly rate.
    This was a revelation for me when I began doing it. I was charging clients a measly rate because I was afraid I wasn’t worth anything more. Raising my rate improved my business on all fronts – I was getting more time to focus on just a few projects instead of several at a time, my clients were better and appreciated the value we provide as professionals, and I was getting work I actually wanted to do. A good rule I use is to raise your rate after each project until people start telling you “no.”
  2. Karma is everything.
    Try your best to be nice and professional to everyone as often as you can. Now, you don’t need to go and kiss arse but you should keep in mind that what goes around, comes around. That kid who emailed you looking for a few tips on design might be the next huge thing in our industry – be careful you don’t dismiss anyone.
  3. No clients? Create passive income for yourself.
    If work in coming in slow, don’t spend all your time seeking new clients. The best thing to do in slow times is create sources of passive income for yourself – income you don’t have to manage much beyond the initial investment of time/money. Whether that means creating Tumblr/Wordpress themes, or creating a design print – be creative, and hustle.”

(Tyler Galpin, a web and UI designer based out of Toronto, Canada. He has worked with a variety of clients, from startups to Fortune 500 companies. His portfolio can be found at http://galp.in. Tyler also co-founded the Lost Type Co-op .)

Read more advices from other successful designers at  http://www.graphicdesignblender.com/freelancing-advice-from-successful-designers.

So, let’s do it and good luck ^_^

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